Friday, October 16, 2009

Dish it up...

Mr. Peacock shared his dish queen affliction last fall. Here's a few more of my favorite black & white porcelain pieces from my collection.

This vintage bowl is one of my favorite pieces of my dish collection! I found this vintage Copeland/Spode bowl ages ago at a flea market. I was drawn to the zodiac pattern and the scalloped edge.

Here’s a detail of Capricorn. I always use this bowl (10” diameter) to serve a side dish at Thanksgiving.


I also use this small platter (12”) at the holidays. It’s a vintage Syracuse China plate—probably from a diner or restaurant. I’ve had it a long time—I think I bought it at a yard sale for $2. I like the black scrolling around the top and bottom edge... for some design reason the scrolling doesn't connect.

Here's a detail of the scrolling pattern. I'm guessing it's from the 1940's or 1950's.

Mr. Peacock recently acquired this inexpensive “You Are My Sunshine” plate.

Here’s a detail of the clothespins (drawn with dots) and paperclips that create the circular pattern around the center type.

This little 4” Danish plate is dated 1967 and is inscribed with “Den standhaftige tinsoldat—handmalet.” I think it translates to “The standing tin soldier.”

Here’s one of my small vintage (4”) Fornasetti plates from the Sun & Moon series.

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Here's a silly video of Cousin Emmy, and Pete Seeger, performing her rendition of "You Are My Sunshine" —circa early 1950's. Have a fun weekend!

4 comments:

pve design said...

Oh my word, what a magnificent collection!
pve

Grant K. Gibson said...

I am in love with anything black and white...

Mr. Bluehaunt said...

I have a few antique brown transferware pieces I like to mix in with other things...

Erik said...

That's some nice pieces you've got there! As a swede, I can help you with the translation of “Den standhaftige tinsoldat—handmalet.”, it means "The decisive tin soldier - hand painted". Standhaftig might also translate to determined, firm, resolute or stout. It is the name of a children's story by the Danish author H.C. Andersen written in 1838.